SAM GOLDSTEIN

NEWS

Charges dropped in assistive devices probe

Someone had to take the blame for the runaway spending in the Assistive Devices Program that finances motorized wheelchairs and scooters for disabled people across Ontario.”

Sexual images land professionals in trouble

Maybe there should be a warning posted on cellphones, computers and electronic devices: “Transmitting or showing sexual images can cost you your livelihood or your liberty.”

Global News: No charges for man accused of posting nude photos without consent

No charges for man accused of posting nude photos without consent

TORONTO — A Toronto photographer and comedian accused of publicly posting racy photos of women online without their consent will not face criminal charges after agreeing to a peace bond Wednesday.

Toronto Criminal Lawyer representing Ren Bostelaar

Man apologizes for posting women's images on website

Ren Bostelaar — one of the people behind the enormously popular @stats_canada Twitter account — apologized Monday for sharing names and “sensitive photos” of women he knows on a website.

Lawyer: Globe and Mail article on mortgages perpetuates xenophobia

This week the Globe and Mail reported foreign homebuyers are getting access to uninsured mortgages from banks like BMO and Scotia without being subjected to rigorous income verification, and critics suggest this could lead to money laundering. Toronto-based criminal Lawyer Sam Goldstein says the article perpetuates xenophobia.

Attempted murder charges tossed four years after suspected gang shooting

In the aftermath of months of gang-related violence, including the July 2012 Danzig St. shooting, police alleged Ad-Ham Khamis was a young man vying for leadership of the Galloway Boys gang.

Khamis, 19, who was shot and wounded later that summer, was arrested in September 2012 and charged with several offences including four counts of attempted murder.

Three of the attempted murder charges, related to a shooting outside a Domino’s Pizza in September 2011, were dismissed after a preliminary inquiry last year, when a judge found there was not enough evidence to proceed, according to Royland Moriah, the lawyer representing Khamis.

Court of Appeal upholds conviction and jail sentence for North Bay fraudster

Ontario’s top court has denied the appeal of a North Bay man convicted of fraud for a “vile and despicable” scheme using photos of sick children to solicit donations that he mostly pocketed.

The trial judge found that Adam Gour collected $450,000 in donations using a group of employees from his non-profit company instructed to pose as volunteers near large stores and on parade routes, the Star reported in November 2012.

The employees were actually paid on commission and Gour kept between 62 and 83 per cent of the profits, states the Ontario Court of Appeal ruling. Less than 3 per cent made it to charity, the ruling says.

Hamilton's 'John Doe' makes bail

A court has released a Hamilton man from custody, despite the fact that police are adamant they have no idea who he is.

The man police and authorities are calling “John Doe” was granted bail on a $25,000 surety after a Toronto bail hearing Friday.

He and his family say he is Houssam Chaar, a 49-year-old construction worker and upstanding citizen. Ontario Provincial Police allege he stole that identity nearly 30 years ago while in Lebanon and has been using that identity to live in Canada illegally and deceive those around him.

Courts to decide whether border guards can force you to reveal phone passwords

Border guards have long had more powers to search individuals than police, but a case this week will finally make Canadian courts determine whether those guards can force you to turn over the passwords to your phone or computer without a warrant, legal and privacy experts tell Yahoo Canada News.

For police, the law was clarified in December when the Supreme Court of Canada ruled on the case of Ontario man Kevin Fearon, who was convicted after a Toronto flea market robbery. Police looked through his cellphone after his arrest and found pictures of a gun and cash and a message about jewelry.

Speaker's Corner: Important constitutional case lives on as turning point for challenging politicians

What do you get when you put together a Jew, a Jehovah’s Witness, a politician, and a poet? If you guessed the most important constitutional case in Canada standing for the legal principle that no person is above the law, then you would be correct. If you guessed the beginning of a bad joke, then probably you would not be too far off either, but it is the legal issue I want to write about.

On Dec. 4, 1946, at the height of the noontime rush, several carloads of uniformed police in Montreal descended on the busy Crescent Street restaurant of Frank Roncarelli, the Jehovah’s Witness in this matter. The police marched through the dining room snatching glasses of wine out of the hands of customers, confiscating all alcoholic beverages on the premises, and demanding Roncarelli to surrender his liquor licence and cease serving wine, beer or spirits. After a five-hour, topsy-turvy search for Jehovah’s Witness pamphlets produced nothing but the inside hole of a bagel, police retreated.

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